A solar storm creates breathtaking northern lights in the United States

A solar storm hit earth on Tuesday, bringing stunning auroras to the northern United States and Canada.

The storm made headlines over the weekend when Dr. Tamitha Skov announced on Friday that she had spotted a “snake-like filament” on the Sun’s surface — and it was moving toward Earth’s impact zone.

Auroras were seen earlier Friday morning as the storm hit, filling the northern sky with stunning electric shades of purple and green.

Mike Cook, who works in space weather, told DailyMail.com: “There were multiple CMEs [coronal mass ejections] Eruptions of the last few days (solar storms), but there is also a coronal hole (the black hole-like structures) which is the middle disk.’

“We should see the effects of that in the next 2-3 days.”

And it’s true, the cosmic show isn’t over — the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) shows that a G1 class is expected to impact our planet as early as Thursday and late Friday.

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A solar storm hit the earth on Tuesday, bringing stunning aurora borealis to the northern United States and Canada (Alberta pictured).

A solar storm hit the earth on Tuesday, bringing stunning aurora borealis to the northern United States and Canada (Alberta pictured).

The data also shows that a rift in Earth’s magnetic field opened Tuesday, making way for solar winds to enter our planet’s magnetosphere — a region that shields us from harmful solar and cosmic particles.

Along with weakening the power grid and disrupting satellite operations, NOAA warns that this type of system will severely affect draft animals.

CMEs can eject billions of tons of coronal material, whose eruptions have the potential to trigger space weather that can disrupt satellites and power grids on Earth, and be harmful to unprotected astronauts.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) shows that a G1 class is expected to hit our planet as early as Thursday and late Friday.

Auroras were seen earlier Friday morning as the storm hit, filling the northern sky with stunning electric shades of purple and green.  Pictured is a shot taken in Seattle, Washington

Auroras were seen earlier Friday morning as the storm hit, filling the northern sky with stunning electric shades of purple and green. Pictured is a shot taken in Seattle, Washington

The storm made headlines over the weekend when Dr.  Tamitha Skov (pictured) announced on Friday that she spotted a

The storm made headlines over the weekend when Dr. Tamitha Skov (pictured) announced on Friday that she spotted a “snake-like filament” (region where her hand is located) on the Sun’s surface – and it was moving towards the strike zone

The data also shows that a rift in Earth’s magnetic field opened Tuesday, making way for solar winds to enter our planet’s magnetosphere — a region that shields us from harmful solar and cosmic particles.

Along with weakening the power grid and disrupting satellite operations, NOAA warns that this type of system will severely impact draft animals and generate auroras from northern Michigan to Maine.

Sebastian Voltmer, an internationally acclaimed astrophotographer, told DailyMail.com in an email: “Internet outages will be the least of your worries. GPS, radio failures and pressure changes in the Earth’s upper atmosphere are problematic effects.

“Last time, a cluster of about 40 SpaceX Starlink satellites burned down due to a solar storm.”

The cosmic show isn't over - the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) shows that a G1 class is expected to impact our planet as early as Thursday and late Friday.  Pictured are more auroras from Calgary this morning

The cosmic show isn’t over – the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) shows that a G1 class is expected to impact our planet as early as Thursday and late Friday. Pictured are more auroras from Calgary this morning

The data also shows that a rift in Earth's magnetic field opened Tuesday, making way for solar winds to enter our planet's magnetosphere -- a region that shields us from harmful solar and cosmic particles

The data also shows that a rift in Earth’s magnetic field opened Tuesday, making way for solar winds to enter our planet’s magnetosphere — a region that shields us from harmful solar and cosmic particles

The snake-like filaments are CMEs, which are large ejections of plasma and magnetic field from the Sun’s corona — the outermost layer of a star’s atmosphere.

CMEs can eject billions of tons of coronal material, whose eruptions have the potential to trigger space weather that can disrupt satellites and power grids on Earth, and be harmful to unprotected astronauts.

The sun has always fascinated people – it is not only essential for life, but also dangerously unpredictable.

Last month, astronomers noticed that a dark sunspot aimed directly at Earth had doubled in size in just 24 hours.

SpaceWeather.com writer Tony Phillips wrote, “Yesterday sunspot AR3038 was large. It’s huge today.”

The sun has always fascinated people – it is not only essential for life, but also dangerously unpredictable.  Last month, astronomers noticed that a dark sunspot aimed directly at Earth had doubled in size in just 24 hours

The sun has always fascinated people – it is not only essential for life, but also dangerously unpredictable. Last month, astronomers noticed that a dark sunspot aimed directly at Earth had doubled in size in just 24 hours

Sunspots are dark regions of the Sun that are cooler than other parts of the surface.  Solar flares form near these dark areas of the star.  A pair of massive sunspot swarms, some large enough to engulf the entire Earth, appeared on the sun's surface in April

Sunspots are dark regions of the Sun that are cooler than other parts of the surface. Solar flares form near these dark areas of the star. A pair of massive sunspot swarms, some large enough to engulf the entire Earth, appeared on the sun’s surface in April

And it is now said to be three times the size of the earth.

Sunspots are dark regions of the Sun that are cooler than other parts of the surface. Solar flares form near these dark areas of the star.

A pair of massive sunspot swarms, some large enough to engulf the entire Earth, appeared on the sun’s surface in April.

The two active regions, labeled AR2993 and AR2994, sent scientists into overdrive to learn if Earth should brace for powerful solar flares — but luckily none were sent to us.

However, in early April, Earth narrowly missed a plasma burst associated with a sunspot cluster that had appeared earlier on the star.

The Sun’s recent increase in activity is the result of its approaching the most active phase in its 11-year solar cycle – reaching peak activity in 2024.

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