Hurricane Fiona

Hurricane Fiona has devastated Puerto Rico and made landfall in the Dominican Republic on Monday morning. It will continue to strengthen as it moves towards the Turks and Caicos Islands and Bermuda. Hurricane Fiona made landfall early Monday morning as a Category 1 storm. As of 7 p.m., the center of Fiona was 130 miles southeast of Grand Turk Island. Sustained winds are now up to 105 mph, making it a Category 2 storm, and it will continue to strengthen as it moves northwest at 10 mph. Hurricane force winds extend up to 30 miles outward from central Fiona. Tropical gale force winds stretch about 140 miles. Fiona lashed out at Puerto Rico, shutting off all power and causing catastrophic flooding. It then moved across the eastern half of the Dominican Republic on Monday morning, heading northwest into warmer waters. It will pass east of the eastern Turks and Caicos Islands on Tuesday and is now expected to be a major Category 3 storm through Tuesday afternoon, with maximum sustained winds of up to 115 mph (185 km/h). East of the Bahamas, Fiona is expected to hit winds of 125 and then 130 mph on Wednesday. Wind shear will decrease on Wednesday afternoon. The hurricane will be over warm water with sea temperatures in the mid to high 80’s. Fiona is forecast to be a Category 4 hurricane with winds of 130 miles per hour. This will cause high seas and currents near the islands and along the east coast of the United States. As it nears Bermuda late Thursday through early Friday it will be a Cat 3 with winds of around 120mph. At the moment it looks like the island will be on the east side of the strong hurricane. By Saturday it will be near Nova Scotia and Newfoundland as a Category 1 hurricane with winds of 100 miles per hour. There are now two areas we’re keeping an eye on in tropes, and both have a slim chance of developing over the next five days. Disordered showers and thunderstorms are associated with a low-pressure system over the central subtropical Atlantic. The system could develop further in the next few days, but the chances of founding a company are only 30%. The system will generally move north while staying above open water. Another tropical wave west of the Windward Islands has been identified by the NHC for possible development later in the week. The probability is low at 20%, but this wave needs to be monitored with a keen eye as some forecast data shows the potential for development after entering the Caribbean and setting a possible WNW course that would target the Yucatan Channel. So far this year we’ve had six named storms, three of which have become hurricanes. Normally we would now have nine named storms, four hurricanes and one or two major hurricanes. Dry air, Saharan dust and wind shear have played important roles in preventing tropical development and intensification this season. Stay tuned to WDSU Weather for the latest updates.

Hurricane Fiona has devastated Puerto Rico and made landfall in the Dominican Republic on Monday morning. It will continue to strengthen on its way to the Turks and Caicos Islands and Bermuda.

Hurricane Fiona made landfall early Monday morning as a Category 1 storm. As of 7 p.m., the center of Fiona was 130 miles southeast of Grand Turk Island. Sustained winds are now up to 105 mph, making it a Category 2 storm, and it will continue to strengthen as it moves northwest at 10 mph.

tropics

Gale force winds extend up to 30 miles outward from central Fiona. Tropical gale force winds stretch about 140 miles.

Fiona struck Puerto Rico, shutting off all power and causing catastrophic flooding. It then moved across the eastern half of the Dominican Republic on Monday morning, heading northwest into warmer waters. It will pass east of the eastern Turks and Caicos Islands on Tuesday and is now expected to be a major Category 3 storm through Tuesday afternoon, with maximum sustained winds of up to 115 mph (185 km/h).

East of the Bahamas, Fiona is expected to hit winds of 125 and then 130 mph on Wednesday. Wind shear will decrease on Wednesday afternoon. The hurricane will be over warm water with sea temperatures in the mid to high 80’s. Fiona is forecast to be a Category 4 hurricane with winds of 130 miles per hour. This will cause high seas and currents near the islands and along the east coast of the United States.

As it nears Bermuda late Thursday through early Friday it will be a Cat 3 with winds of around 120mph. At the moment it looks like the island will be on the east side of the powerful hurricane.

By Saturday it will be a Category 1 hurricane with winds of 100 miles per hour near Nova Scotia and Newfoundland.

tropics

There are now two areas we are monitoring in the tropics and both have a slim chance of developing over the next five days. Disordered showers and thunderstorms are associated with a low-pressure system over the central subtropical Atlantic. The system could develop further in the next few days, but the chances of founding a company are only 30%. The system will generally move north while staying above open water.

Another tropical wave west of the Windward Islands has been identified by the NHC for possible development later in the week. The odds are slim at 20%, but this wave needs to be monitored with a keen eye as some forecast data shows the potential for development after incurring into the Caribbean and setting a possible WNW course targeting the Yucatan Channel would.

tropics

So far this year we have had six named storms, three of which have become hurricanes. Normally we would now have nine named storms, four hurricanes and one or two major hurricanes. Dry air, Saharan dust and wind shear have played important roles in preventing tropical development and intensification this season.

Stay tuned to WDSU Weather for the latest updates.

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